May is Jewish American Heritage Month
The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service and United States Holocaust Memorial Museum join in paying tribute to the generations of Jewish Americans who have helped form the fabric of American history, culture and society.

2019 Event Highlights

Book Talk

May 2

The Unwanted: America, Auschwitz, and a Village Caught in Between
In “The Unwanted,” Michael Dobbs tells the powerful story of German Jews from the village of Kippenheim who sought American visas to escape Nazi Germany. He also recounts America's response to the refugee crisis of the 1930s and 1940s. Only one in four of the villagers managed to gain entry to the U.S. or another country; the remainder perished in French camps or, later, in Auschwitz

(National Archives and Records Administration)

Book Talk

May 6

Joining the Club: A History of Jews and Yale
The Hebraic Section of the African & Middle Eastern Division (Library of Congress) and the Jewish Genealogy Society of Greater Washington present Dan A. Oren, M.D., Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Oren will speak about his book “Joining the Club: A History of Jews and Yale.”

(Library of Congress)

Film Screening

May 6

GI Jews: Jewish Americans in World War II
The National Archives in partnership with Park University (Parkville, MO) will host a film screening of GI Jews: Jewish Americans in World War II. Reservations are requested for this free program.

(National Archives and Records Administration)

Book Talk

May 23

America's Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today
Pamela Nadell, American University history professor and author of “America's Jewish Women,” weaves together stories of a diverse group of extraordinary people. For more than two centuries scores of these activists, suffragists, wives, and mothers have helped carve out a Jewish American identity.
View on Youtube.

(National Archives and Records Administration)

Daily Exhibition

Daily

Americans and the Holocaust
What did Americans know? What more could have been done? This exhibition is a portrait of American society that shows how the Depression, isolationism, xenophobia, racism, and antisemitism shaped responses to Nazism and the Holocaust. It reveals how much information was available to Americans at the time and asks why rescuing Jews did not become a priority, except for a few individuals who took the risk to help.

(United States Holocaust Memorial Museum)

Brought to you by:

National Gallery of Art Library of Congress Smithsonian Institution National Archives United States Holocaust Memorial Museum National Park Service National Endowment for the Humanities